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How To Effectively Maintain A Good Work-Life Balance

How To Effectively Maintain A Good Work-Life Balance

Recent statistics have shown that more than 60 percent of employees find it difficult to maintain a good work-life balance. With that being said, the big question is how do you balance your work-life without it affecting your personal life?

 Before we delve into how you can effectively balance your work-life, it is ideal for us to have a clear grasp of what a healthy work-life balance is. 

What does work-life balance mean?

We are currently in a world where the lines between work and home are becoming increasingly blurred?

In a perfect world, we should be able to carry out activities that interest us after work, whether it’s spending time with friends, or family, or engaging in a pastime.

The concept of “balance” is simple enough to grasp, but what does it imply? 

It is definitely beyond just hanging out with friends during weekends to watch a football match or spend some time with family.

We tend to believe that we can be productive at all times, or that an eight-hour workday equals eight hours of output. 

That, however, is just not the case. Employees don’t generate any more beyond a certain amount of hours, according to research, but the impact on their health increases considerably.

Work-life balance can be described as the trade-off between time spent at work and time spent on other, non-work activities.

 Weariness and stress-related health difficulties are more common in workaholics and those who fail to have a healthy work-life balance.

Work-life balance has an impact on every aspect of your life. 

However, it manifests itself in different ways for different people.

Here are eight signs linked to a lack of work-life balance:

1 . When you’re not at work, you can’t stop thinking about it. 

Burnout is more likely among those who find it difficult to establish a line between job and personal life.

2 . Your personal and professional connections are starting to deteriorate. With coworkers, you may be easily irritated, and with loved ones, you may be distant.

3 . You have an odd feeling about yourself. You are experiencing unexplained aches and pains. When you’re at work, you might not have much energy or find it difficult to concentrate.

4 . Everything appears uninteresting or irrelevant while you’re not at work. You just don’t want to do anything until you have to. You frequently decline invites, distancing yourself even further from your friends.

5 . You spend a lot of money on personal duties that you outsource. Laundry, dishes, and mail pile up waiting for the day when you’ll “have time.”

6 . When you’re sick, physically drained, or need to take care of personal matters, it’s difficult to take time off. You can’t recall your previous trip and have no intentions to take one now.

7 . You can’t picture spending the rest of your life doing what you’re doing currently. Even if you work in a field or for a firm that you once adored, it’s difficult to fathom living life as it is for very long. 

8 . You always feel like you should be doing something else, no matter what you’re doing. This absence of presence and direction frequently leads to an existential crisis over time.

How can you achieve a perfect work-life balance?

The truth is that no single prescription will work for everyone. 

It’s also possible that you’ll have to experiment with which time scale feels most appropriate to you. 

Trying to establish balance in a single day might be difficult, but it may be easier to attain over a week or more. 

Learning to check in with your inner compass — and your results — is the best approach to establish the optimum balance for you.

You may re-calibrate your expectations and reset your work-life balance with a little ingenuity and intention.

One piece of advice: begin small. 

Although you may wish for a better work-life balance, your work habits have developed over time and are unlikely to change overnight. 

If your goal is to reduce screen time, for example, limiting yourself to a set amount of hours will most likely frustrate you. 

If you start with a smaller goal, such as one five-minute tech-free break per day, you’re more likely to stay with it.

Here are 12 suggestions for achieving a better work-life balance 

1. Make a schedule that allows you to integrate work with leisure, social, or exercise activities. If you have numerous virtual meetings scheduled in a row, try taking them while out for a stroll. You could alternatively take a call outside (if the ambient noise permits!) or invite a coworker over.

2. Accept the way your brain functions. To work in small, focused spurts, utilize productivity tricks like a Pomodoro timer. 

To make the most of your time, block out any other distractions.

3. Create time chunks for different jobs. Have time to check (and answer to) messages, a time to attend meetings, and a time to conduct intellectually demanding tasks. It’s a good idea to schedule these duties around periods when you’re most productive.

4. Put a time limit on your work. “Work grows to fill the time allocated,” as the phrase goes, and working from home makes it even simpler to let work spill over into personal time. 

Set an end-of-day deadline and stick to it by turning off work-related devices, locking your office, or scheduling something else.

5. Use technology to assist you with unplugging. 

During the day, use an app to block distracting websites, and then block work tools after hours. If you can, limit your work to one device or keep one device free of work so you may entirely disengage.

6. Have lunch with employees or go out for lunch. 

Even if you work from home, you can go out for lunch or communicate with coworkers. The change of pace will be welcome — and will, of course, prompt you to eat something.

7. Take a break. 

When you’re at home all of the time, you’re more likely to try to work through diseases that might have kept you at home otherwise. Sick time, personal time, vacations, and mourning are all vital strategies to replenish your wellbeing.

8. Mindfulness makes imbalance difficult to overlook. 

You get more in tune with your emotions and physical sensations when you practice mindfulness techniques like meditation or breath awareness. Paying attention to these feelings can help you recognize when you’re ignoring a need to get things done. It’s difficult to get back to that spreadsheet once your tummy starts to grumble.

9. Find something you enjoy doing outside of work. 

It will be simpler to disconnect from work messages or end your day at a certain time if you have something exciting planned for after work. Our pastimes provide us with more energy and vitality. We bring our fresh selves back to work when we play and feel creative.

10. Rethink employment that makes you long for a sense of balance. If your work feels utterly disconnected from the things that pique your interest, excitement, energy, and feeling of purpose, you may need to reconsider what you’re doing or how you’re doing it. While work does not have to (and often does not) meet all of your demands for purpose, meaning, social connection, or challenge, we can expect it to bring moments of satisfaction, accomplishment, and connection.

11. Keep in touch with your boss. The anxiety of not doing enough often exacerbates a lack of work-life balance. 

Speaking with your leaders can assist you in determining where you should spend your time. If there is truly too much to accomplish, it may be time to consider hiring more help or streamlining some chores.

12. Seek the advice of a coach or therapist. 

Working with a professional can be beneficial if you’re feeling overwhelmed, trapped, or don’t know where to start disconnecting. A coach or counselor can assist you in determining which adjustments will have the most impact and how to begin.

Conclusion

More than 60 percent of employees find it difficult to maintain a good work-life balance. Workaholics and those who fail to have a healthy work/life balance are more prone to burnout. How can you achieve a perfect work-life balance? No single prescription will work for everyone. Start small and re-calibrate your expectations with a little ingenuity and intention. 

Try to establish balance in a single day, but it may be easier to attain over a week or more. 

If you’re working from home, it can be easy to let work spill over into personal time. Use tools like a Pomodoro timer to schedule tasks in small, focused spurts. 

Try unplugging during the day and then blocking work-related devices at night. If your work feels utterly disconnected from the things that pique your interest, excitement, energy, and feeling of purpose, you may need to reconsider what you’re doing. 

Seek the advice of a coach or therapist if you’re feeling overwhelmed, trapped, or don’t know where to start disconnecting.

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